April 2017

MEDIA STATEMENT

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Queensland Productivity Commission releases findings of competitive neutrality complaint

The Queensland Productivity Commission has released the findings from its investigation into a competitive neutrality complaint against CITEC Confirm, a Queensland Government-owned business unit that provides information brokerage.

Under section 23 of the Queensland Productivity Act 2015, the Commission can investigate whether a government agency carrying on a significant business activity enjoys a competitive advantage on the basis of government taxes, debt guarantee fees, procedural or regulatory requirements.

In this complaint raised by a private sector competitor InfoTrack—the first to be considered by the Commission—the Commission found CITEC Confirm’s activities did not breach the principle of competitive neutrality as defined by the Act.

Commissioner Kim Wood said his team’s investigation had been thorough and rigorous.

“Competitive neutrality says there should be a level playing field—that a government business or agency should not have a competitive advantage (or disadvantage) over the private sector solely due to their government ownership,” he said.

“As this was the first major competitive neutrality complaint we’d received since formation, our team investigated the matter over 18 months.

“The Commission found no government directive, policy, legislation or standards pertaining to information brokerage that would give CITEC Confirm an advantage over its private sector competitors.”

The Commission submitted the investigation report to the Treasurer on 27 February 2017, received the Treasurer’s written response to it on 10 April 2017, and released the report today on its website.

The competitive neutrality investigation report and the Treasurer’s response to the report can be found on the Commission’s website at: http://www.qpc.qld.gov.au/competitive-neutrality/finalised-cn-reports/

The Queensland Productivity Commission provides independent advice on complex economic and regulatory issues. It proposes policy reforms to drive economic growth, lift productivity and improve living standards across Queensland.

Media enquiries

Suzanne Oxford

0413 875 806

 

 

MEDIA STATEMENT

Monday, 3 April 2017

Queensland Productivity Commission examines service delivery to Indigenous communities
The Queensland Productivity Commission has released a consultation paper for the inquiry into service delivery to Queensland’s remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Commissioner Professor Bronwyn Fredericks said governments deliver a wide range of services to remote and discrete communities.

“Services include education and training, health care and public safety services, as well as basic services such as water, electricity supply, town planning and maintenance of roads,” she said.

“Many innovative and successful programs have been implemented by, and for, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, but the outcomes for some programs and services have not met expectations.

“The Queensland Government has asked the Commission to identify how available resources can be best used to improve outcomes for these communities.”

Professor Fredericks said the Commission aims to understand what works well, and why.

“We will conduct a rigorous, evidence-based assessment and make recommendations to improve the effectiveness of services delivered to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people,” she said.

“The Commission is asking those interested to use this consultation paper as a guide to provide their views.

“We are seeking feedback on the scope of the inquiry, and evidence from all stakeholders on the issues covered by the terms of reference.”

The Commission will consult widely with stakeholders throughout Queensland during the inquiry. A draft report is scheduled for release in August 2017, and a final report will be provided to the government in November 2017.

Submissions on the consultation paper are invited by 2 June 2017.

The consultation paper can be accessed at:  http://www.qpc.qld.gov.au/inquiries/indigenous-services/
Media enquiries:
Suzanne Oxford
0413 875 806

 

 

February 2017

MEDIA STATEMENT

Thursday, 2 February 2017

Queensland Productivity Commission inquiry into service delivery to Indigenous communities

A DETAILED inquiry into service delivery to Queensland’s remote and discrete Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island communities is underway by the Queensland Productivity Commission (QPC).

Queensland Treasurer, the Hon. Curtis Pitt, announced the Inquiry into service delivery in Indigenous communities late last year, along with appointing Professor Bronwyn Fredericks as a Commissioner for the QPC.

“I am committed to delivering a rigorous, evidence-based assessment with the aim of improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples,” Professor Fredericks said.

“The inquiry will examine what the Queensland Government spends on services, whether these investments are delivering for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and identify if they can be improved.

“As part of the inquiry we will consult widely, including visiting interested stakeholders across the state.

“I encourage everyone to register their interest on the QPC website: www.qpc.qld.gov.au

The Commission will release a consultation paper in March to facilitate discussion with all stakeholders, and a draft report will be prepared by August 2017 for a further round of consultation. The final report will be submitted to the Queensland Government by 30 November 2017.

Our Commissioner

Professor Bronwyn Fredericks, a Murri woman from southeast Queensland, has been appointed as part-time Commissioner for the inquiry.

Professor Fredericks is Pro Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous Engagement) and the BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance Chair in Indigenous Engagement with CQ University, Australia.

Professor Fredericks has worked in the education, health care and human services sector for state and federal governments, as well as non-government organisations, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled health services. She is a Board Member of the Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council (QAIHC) and the Central Queensland Region Aboriginal and Islander Community Controlled Health Organisation.

Professor Fredericks holds several distinguished roles in Indigenous research. She is a member of the Research Advisory Committee for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) and the National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN). Her research has focused on the socio-psychological aspects of chronic disease, public health interventions and Indigenous women’s health issues, along with training and education.

About the Commission

The Queensland Productivity Commission provides independent advice on complex economic and regulatory issues, with the objective of driving economic growth, lifting productivity, and improving living standards across Queensland.

The Commission is established as a separate legal entity and statutory body under its own legislation, the Queensland Productivity Commission Act 2015.

Our work encompasses four key streams:

  • public inquiries into productivity, economic development and industry matters
  • regulatory advice and guidance to departments
  • policy research
  • reports on competitive neutrality complaints

The Commission operates independently from the Queensland Government — its views, findings and recommendations are based on its own analyses and judgments.

Wide-ranging, open and transparent public consultation underpin the Commission’s functions.

Media contact:

Suellen Hinde

0403 807 535

 

November 2016

MEDIA STATEMENT

Wednesday, 9 November 2016

Queensland Productivity Commission releases Issues Paper for Inquiry into Manufacturing in Queensland

The Queensland Productivity Commission has released an issues paper for the manufacturing inquiry seeking input from the public, organisations and industry.

QPC Principal Commissioner Kim Wood said manufacturing in Queensland was facing challenges but also had many opportunities.

“Manufacturing is impacted by international competition, new domestic and international markets, workforce capabilities, the level of innovation and business costs,” Mr Wood said.

“In 2014–15, manufacturing contributed more than $20 billion to the Queensland economy and employed over 160,000 people.”

“That is why the QPC is dedicated to delivering an effective inquiry that delivers practical policy options for government grounded in robust economic advice.”

Mr Wood said the QPC would investigate options to improve the productivity and competitiveness of the manufacturing sector including in regional Queensland.

“The Queensland Government has asked the Commission to assess the sector’s performance and potential and the effectiveness of current policy and regulatory settings,” he said.

“The Commission has also been asked to report on the changing nature of manufacturing in Queensland and the experience and policy reforms from overseas jurisdictions.”

“First, we would like contributions from the wider public and industry on the issues and are asking those interested to use this issues paper as a guide in providing their feedback.”

The Commission will consult widely with stakeholders throughout Queensland during the inquiry. A draft report is scheduled for release in May 2017, with a final report provided to the government in August 2017.

Submissions on the issues paper are invited by 10 January 2017. The issues paper can be accessed at: http://www.qpc.qld.gov.au/inquiries/manufacturing/

About the Commission

The Commission provides independent advice on complex economic and regulatory issues, with the objective of driving economic growth, lifting productivity, and improving living standards across Queensland.

The Commission is established as a separate legal entity and statutory body under its own legislation, the Queensland Productivity Commission Act 2015.

Our work encompasses four key streams:

  • public inquiries into productivity, economic development and industry matters
  • regulatory advice and guidance to departments
  • policy research
  • reports on competitive neutrality complaints

The Commission operates under the principles of independence, rigour, responsiveness, transparency, equity, efficiency and effectiveness.

Media contact

0403 807 535